ABORIGINAL ART - 4


Non-figurative Art Styles

Non-figurative art styles include abstract designs, geometric patterns, and the array of circles, spirals and concentric circles found in Central Australian Aboriginal art. Although meaningless from a European perspective, this art holds great significance to its creators.

Ovals, circles, spirals and concentric circles signify water holes, places, and significant features in accompanying stories. U-shapes represent people. Arc shapes represent the wind breaks around people’s camps, hills, and occasionally boomerangs. Short wavy lines represent snakes, or snake tracks. Long wavy and meandering lines represent the pathways of animals and ancestors, or creeks, hills and lines of trees.

Busg ornages Reggie Sultan

 

Collecting Bush Oranges. A painting by Kaitish artist Reggie Sultan, Central Australia.
The U-shaped motifs are the traditional symbols representing a seated person, and in this case, each arc represents a woman. The oval shapes on each side represent the women’s coolamons (wooden bark dishes) which are used to collect the bush fruit.
Photo: David M. Welch

 

Ancient petroglyphs showing concentric circles 
(non-naturalistic art style). 
Inland South Australia.
Photo: David M. Welch.

Aboriginal Petroglyphs

 

Aboriginal rock art

 

A jumble of non-figurative motifs superimposed upon each other, engraved at Ewaninga, Central Australia.
Photo: David M. Welch

READ MORE ... PART 1 PART 2 PART 3 PART 4 PART 5

 


 

Read About Reggie Sultan, an Aboriginal Artist --->



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