ABORIGINAL BODY ADORNMENT - 2

The body adornments and body painting worn by Aboriginal people varied throughout the country. In the description of body adornments here, they are divided into two groups: those worn as everyday items, and those reserved for ceremonial occasions.
 

Everyday body adornments
Most of the everyday items are no longer worn, having been replaced by modern clothing. (In the past, people were naked, and only in the coldest parts of southern Australia did they wear possum fur and kangaroo fur cloaks during winter.)

Everyday body adornments, serving decorative and sometimes functional roles, included:

 

Aboriginal body adornment

A headband worn by a Larrakeyah man in the Northern Territory, made of string from banyan tree fibres, painted with white clay. Late 1800s.
(Paul Foelsche Collection, South Australia Museum, photograph by David M. Welch.).

 

Aboriginal body adornment

A hair decoration made of three teeth from a tree kangaroo, mounted in native bees wax resin, and tied to a length of human-hair string. Northern Queensland.
From 17 Years Wandering Among the Aboriginals.

 

Emu feathers tied to a bone point, worn as a hair decoration in northern Queensland.
From 17 Years Wandering Among the Aboriginals.

Aboriginal body adornment

 

Aboriginal body adornment

A mother and child wearing simple armbands. c1935. Arnhem Land, Northern Territory.
Photograph by Donald Thomson, from Thomson Time: Arnhem Land in the 1930s.

 

A northern Queensland man wearing a simple armband and waist belt made from plant fibres.
He holds a spear, and a spearthrower
with a shell handle.
From 17 Years Wandering Among the Aboriginals.

Aboriginal body adornment

 

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