TRADITIONAL ABORIGINAL BUSH FOODS - 3

(D) INSECT BY-PRODUCTS.
These include the honey produced by honey ants (the honey sack attached to the ant is eaten, but not the ant itself), lerp and other sugary substances deposited on gum leaves (Eucalypt species) resulting from insect activity, and edible galls which grow on gums and acacias also from insect activity.

     

 

Selma Thompson (in green top) and Lena Nambula (in purple top) dig for honey ants with their families in Central Australia.
Photo: David M. Welch.

Aboriginal foods

 

Aboriginal foods

 

The honey ants are collected in bark strips.
Photo: David M. Welch

 

 


Honey ants (and lumps of red dirt).
Photo: David M. Welch

 

Aboriginal foods

 

 

(E) BIRDS.
Large birds like emus and jabirus were hunted with spears. Across Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory, light bamboo-grass goose spears were thrown with the aid of spearthrowers into flocks of magpie geese. In Central Australia, stones were thrown into flocks of budgerigars in order to catch whatever birds were hit and fell to the ground.

 

(F) AMPHIBIANS – FROGS.
These include the ornate burrowing frog of northern Queensland.

 

The Ornate Burrowing Frog (Limnodynastes ornatus) from the Queensland rainforest is eaten.

Photo: from 17 Years Wandering Among the Aboriginals.

 

 

(G) REPTILES.
These include lizards, snakes, tortoises, turtles, and crocodiles.

Lena Nambula digs down into the burrow of a sand goanna in the desert region of Central Australia
Photo: David M. Welch .

Aboriginal foods

 

Aboriginal foods

 

Success!
Photo: David M. Welch

READ MORE ... PART 1 PART 2 PART 3 PART 4

Aboriginal Culture Topics...


INTRODUCTION


REGIONAL
VARIATIONS


RELIGION

 


SOCIAL
ORGANISATION

Art


Bags, Baskets, and Containers


Body Adornment

Bush Foods

Ceremonial Life


Fishing
Methods


Fire
Making

Housing
and Shelters

Stone
Tools


Tree
Climbing


Wooden Tools
and Weapons

Material is copyright to www.aboriginalculture.com.au and David M. Welch.
Students may use material from this site for study projects.
Please acknowledge your source as www.aboriginalculture.com.au, and show the year of access.
The author of all written material is David M. Welch.
Teachers and others may download, print and use material for teaching,
providing you notify your administrative staff or Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) to arrange a contribution. Thank you.